Adjectives are Cheap: Sell Yourself with Nouns and Verbs

April 2nd, 2014 | Guest Contributor | 5 Comments

Adjectives Are CheapGuest Post by Ann Wylie

“Adjectives are cheap. Everyone is a ‘best selling’ author or a ‘sought after’ speaker or a ‘world class’ coach. Nouns are more expensive: How many BOOKS, how many SPEECHES, how many CLIENTS?” ~Alan Weiss, principle, Summit Consulting Group

My long-term webmaster is leaving for greener pastures — Sniff! — which has left me searching for help from, among other resources, oDesk. Here’s what I’ve found:

Don’t get shot down.

Make your argument with verbs and nouns, not adjectives and adverbs.

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Putting the Art in Article, Part I: Beginner Thou ART, Teach I Shall

March 26th, 2014 | Guest Contributor | 5 Comments

Pyramid of ArtGuest Post by Alicia Lawrence

Creative web content is all the rage in the marketing world. Great copy isn’t enough anymore to capture and keep readers—they need visuals.

Image courtesy Alicia Lawrence, used with permission

Below I’ve collected a list of tools to help you put the “art” in your article. I’ve separated the list into a “pyramid” based on your expertise. The beginner section consists of the most tools, as that will be the foundation for more advanced web graphics.

Before we get our hands dirty in digital paint…

Let’s look at some of the basic terms you’ll hear when it comes to creative web content.

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#measurePR Recap: Complying Socially with Eric Schwartzman

March 19th, 2014 | Guest Contributor | 6 Comments

Eric SchwartzmanGuest Post by Jen Zingsheim Phillips

We had a lively group on board for the #measurePR chat held on March 4, with very special guest Eric Schwartzman of Comply Socially. The primary discussion centered on privacy, and what the boundaries are for those who monitor social media.

The chat was kicked off with a question about the risks of social media monitoring in the workplace. Eric noted that the biggest risks of social media monitoring are: intrusion of privacy, invasion of privacy, and the potential to use social media for job applicant screening. This tweet caused some to bristle a bit:

Tressa Robbins followed up with a very good question, asking: Continue reading »

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